Raising Awareness
It is our hope that autism becomes embraced as a subject and as a condition. With so many people suffering in silence we have decided to become the voice for many. Let us know how we can help you, even if only for a friendly chat!

What is autism?

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a condition that affects social interaction, communication, interests and behaviour. It includes Asperger syndrome and childhood autism.
The main features of ASD typically start to develop in childhood, although the impact of these may not be apparent until there is a significant change in the person’s life, such as a change of school.


In the UK, it's estimated that about one in every 100 people has ASD.

There is no 'cure' for ASD, but a wide range of treatments – including education and behaviour support – can help people with the condition.

Some people also use the term autism spectrum condition or ‘neurodiverse’ (as opposed to people without autism being ‘neurotypical’).

It is useful for parents to know the signs and symptoms of autism and Asperger syndrome that are related to their child’s stages of development.

See your GP if you notice any of the symptoms of ASD or if you’re concerned about your child’s development. You can discuss your concerns together in depth before deciding whether your child should be referred for a specialist assessment.


Getting a diagnosis

Autism features can often be recognised in children before the age of two or three years. However for many, the signs will often only become more noticeable as they get older.

See your GP or health visitor if you notice any of the symptoms of ASD, or if you’re concerned about your child’s development. You can discuss your concerns together in depth before deciding whether your child should be referred for specialist assessment. It can also be helpful to discuss your concerns with your child’s nursery or school.

Adults can also be diagnosed with ASD. See your GP if you are concerned. They may use a screening tool to check if you have signs of ASD and they can refer you to appropriate services in your area.


Caring for someone with ASD

Being a Carer is not an easy role. When you are busy responding to the needs of others, it can affect your emotional and physical energy and make it easy to forget your own health and mental wellbeing.

If you're caring for someone else, it is important to look after yourself and get as much help as possible. It is in your best interests and those of the person you care for.”

This information was taken from NHS Choices – www.nhs.uk



Autism Birmingham Community Interest Company N.o 8436641